Patterned Existence: Cory Imig

The Concept/OK:Art in Oklahoma exhibition welcomes the public until February 16, 2013 at the new Tulsa Arts and Humanities Council’s Hardesty Arts Center. Admission is free of charge. See www.concept-ok.org for more information. 

Through a partnership with the Charlotte Street Foundation, the Focus artists will also present their work at the La Esquina gallery in Kansas City in March 2013. The Focus OK-KC component includes four Oklahoma artists and five Kansas City, MO artists developing new work for the exhibitions in both Tulsa and Kansas City. Read more in this Art Focus Oklahoma magazine article about the Focus artists. 

Watch Cory Imig’s artist profile video

Kansas City, MO 
Project Statement: 
My work is primarily installation based, placing various ideas in the same space and asking the viewer to draw connections.  I organize information, meticulously categorizing everyday situations, interactions among other people, and my relationship to the world around me.  After spending a major part of this past year focusing on the idea of curating and the organization of exhibitions, I realized how closely related those ideas are to the work that I produce.  I highlight and emphasize patterns of time, whether those patterns exist in my daily activities or are embedded in ideas I find interesting.  
Biography: 
Cory Imig is an interdisciplinary artist currently working in Kansas City, Missouri. She received her BFA from Savannah College of Art and Design in 2008. In 2011, she was accepted into the Charlotte Street Foundation’s studio residency program and has since participated in numerous group shows. Imig and four others were awarded a Rocket Grant as part of the regional regranting program through The Andy Warhol Foundation in support of PLUG Projects, an artist-run curatorial collaboration. Imig is a current regional fellow in the Oklahoma Art Writing and Curatorial Fellowship Program organized by the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition.
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Together & Now: Charlie Mylie & Lindsey Griffith

The Concept/OK:Art in Oklahoma exhibition welcomes the public until February 16 at the new Tulsa Arts and Humanities Council’s Hardesty Arts Center. Admission is free of charge. See www.concept-ok.org for more information. 

Through a partnership with the Charlotte Street Foundation, the Focus artists will also present their work at the La Esquina gallery in Kansas City in March 2013. The Focus OK-KC component includes four Oklahoma artists and five Kansas City, MO artists developing new work for the exhibitions in both Tulsa and Kansas City. Read more in this Art Focus Oklahoma magazine article about the Focus artists. 

Watch Lindsey Griffith & Charlie Mylie’s artist profile video
Kansas City, MO 
Project Statement: 
There is a card from a deck of propositions, the Oblique Strategies, which reads: “Gardening, Not Architecture.” This is how Lindsey and Charlie approach experience creation. They cultivate nourishing moments with interpersonal tools like honesty, receptivity, fearlessness, sincere zeal, and the youthful strength of YOLO [you only live once] in the fertile beds of novelty, intimacy, danger, excitement, desire, and experiments. Lindsey and Charlie have been experimenting with intimacy and playing together across Kansas City since they met in June 2012. Their efforts and findings have been channeled into art projects, a to-do list consultation service, KC Free Skool classes, and a zine,The Sweetness of Raw Fruit.
Biography: 
Lindsey Griffith is a Kansas City artist and performer. She is currently creating zines, to-do lists, and visceral experiences for herself and others. Lindsey writes, builds, creates, and performs with the collaborative Whoop Dee Doo. She performs as Wet Clown on their traveling faux public-access kids show. Lindsey eagerly teaches and learns with KC Free Skool. Her current to-do list includes baking a half-birthday cake and teaching herself lock picking. 
Griffith works collaboratively with Charlie Mylie, a Kansas City artist that is finding pleasure in emergent life that springs from collaborative work. “You like to have fun; you find fun in the educational encounters between the everyday and the absolutely novel. You work in a gallery, teach art classes at a community center, and participate in the fresh, local educational models of Rad School and KC FREE SKOOL. You also live and work in collective housing that tries to restore lost homes in a blighted urban area. Mostly you like games and are tickled by the challenge of this grand one we’re playing.”

Don’t Think About It: Jason Carron

The Concept/OK:Art in Oklahoma exhibition welcomes the public until February 16 at the new Tulsa Arts and Humanities Council’s Hardesty Arts Center. Admission is free of charge. See www.concept-ok.org for more information. 

Through a partnership with the Charlotte Street Foundation, the Focus artists will also present their work at the La Esquina gallery in Kansas City in March 2013. The Focus OK-KC component includes four Oklahoma artists and five Kansas City, MO artists developing new work for the exhibitions in both Tulsa and Kansas City. Read more in this Art Focus Oklahoma magazine article about the Focus artists. 




Jason Carron 
Kansas City, MO
Project Statement: 
The command ”don’t think about it” is generally an inward command to ourselves. It is a popular coping mechanism we use to overcome many things. Giving ourselves the permission to ignore or overlook something can relieve internal conflicts and stresses.  Although this mechanism is usually criticized, it is necessary because of the overwhelming amount of information available.
This artwork provokes thought (as most artworks do), but at the same time it outwardly rejects thought.  This puts the viewer in an ironic situation.  The moving, monstrous heads create a facade which seems to discourage entry.  The best thing is to turn back and do not think about it.
Biography: 
Jason Carron is an emerging artist living and working in Kansas City, MO. The majority of his current work is in video format. His videos are minimal and repetitive, exploring intuitive humanistic expressions. While his work is quite literal and simple, the use of his body reflects the complex nature of the human condition. 

Local Materials + Big Ideas= Paul Bagley

By Victoria Saccomagno
Paul Bagley, Home,Mixed Media Installation, Dimensions Variable, 2012  
Oklahoma City-based artist Paul Bagley works with raw materials to create beautiful and thought-provoking structures. Interacting with the environment instead of solely taking from it is an important part of his work. In speaking casually with him one can immediately sense his progressive attitude toward his life and his art. Bagley perseveres with the motivation to constantly challenge himself by working in tough conditions, such as the projects he has done at Burning Man. I was able to ask him a few questions about the inspiration, preferences, and challenges behind his work.
Q:Generally, what would you say is the inspiration behind your work? Is there an abstraction of form, or do the forms speak for themselves without having a reference?
PB: In essence, I think I’m trying to discover the roots of art, and in that I find myself in love with raw materials for 3D work; i.e. wood, metal, glass, clay, natural materials, preferably up-cycled/recycled/reincarnated/repurposed. I love building something that I’ve drawn on paper. I draw all the time, but sometimes want to be immersed in what I draw.
Q:Do you have a preferred medium? I know that you work with metals, is there a particular type that is more suited to the type of work that you like to produce?
PB: Good question. I used to work commercially in 2D. I did it for so long that I wanted to move on and started to make 3D work, more present and effective. I made it a point to avoid new synthetic materials, especially toxic ones. I realize steel is energy intensive, but it’s a brute and raw material for the ages. I don’t want to use toxic resins or petrochemicals in my work. This includes architecturally. I like using earth materials that are annual renewables  like straw. Some methods I’ve worked include straw bale, rammed straw, recycled paper-crete, cobb, adobe, etc. Basically, there’s an art and regional beauty to the world, which means building with local materials. You can build a house with what surrounds you.
Paul Bagley, Home (installed at the Hardesty Arts Center),Mixed Media Installation, Dimensions Variable, 2012 
Q:How would you say your process begins? Since your pieces can be so large, is there a sketching/pre-design phase that allows for the structural stability of your work?
PB: Since each piece I make requires a lot of labor, I usually move on to a relatively new idea after accomplishing one that’s been on the drawing board for some time. I start with intent then create the experience through a series of sketches. I usually create a scale model with 2D and 3D software, and then I start building. I usually run into complex surprises that I didn’t realize while using a computer. By building all of my work, I learn a lot after the 3D model is built.
In addition to the insight of his work overall, here is the artist’s statement about his piece entitled “Home” for Concept/OK. The work consisted of multiple red ‘nest’ pieces made from mixed materials that hang in various locations throughout the exhibit. 
PB: The motivations for the work are based upon the concept of home and birth. I am always struck by the empty nests within defoliated trees upon winter. Bird’s nests are a reminder that these unique animals move in direct relation to the tilt of the planets axis against the sun, a remarkable scale of migration beyond most other animals on Earth. Without road signs or maps, birds routinely return from the opposite hemisphere to the exact tree or bridge from which they were born, not unlike salmon and sea turtles. 

The Concept/OK: Art in Oklahoma exhibition welcomes to the public with free admission through February 16, 2013  at the new Tulsa Arts and Humanities Council’s Hardesty Arts Center. Admission is free of charge. See www.concept-ok.org for more information.  Learn more about Bagley at his website http://paulbagley.com or this recent video

Justine Green: Bed Space

Author: Heather Eck
Justine Green, Bed Space,  Oil on Canvas, 12″x9″
Imagine the tiny, cramped interiors of a hospital closet. A harsh fluorescent light is causing organic shadows to escape from the stacked spare beds onto the walls behind them. A stifling relationship between organic shapes and geometric interiors starts to appear.  

This unusual space and relationship is what inspired Tulsa artist, Justine Green, to create her Concept/OK piece titled, Bed Space. Using paint as a medium, Green was able to further enhance the expressive relationships between shapes and form that surface within the piece.  I was able to learn more of her intent as well as the specific process she took in creating the piece. 
Q: What do you want your piece to say to its viewers?
JG: I would want the viewer to have a bodily response to the imagery despite the absence of the figure. The intimate scale of the work should invite the viewer to come close to the piece. The viewer should have a sense of familiarity with the subject but not in a way that describes a narrative.
 Q: Technically speaking, how did you execute this work?
JG: This work is a finished painting. My interior paintings begin from observation and include objects I find in life. In the process there comes a point when direct observation ends and improvisation and invention take over. This distance created by abandoning observation allows for the painting to take on a separate life where I can exploit certain moods or atmospheres.
Q: What is your favorite medium in which to work? Why?
JG: Paint, particularly oil paint, is my favorite medium. There is a never ending fascination with taking what is basically mud- oil and pigment- and smearing it onto a surface to create recognizable forms.   I allow for a lot of time to elapse while making a painting. This time allows for new ideas and drastic changes to be generated before the painting is finished. The physicality of my marks often gives evidence to a history of changes. I like how these marks place significance on process and its role within painting.
The Concept/OK: Art in Oklahoma exhibition welcomes to the public through February 16, 2013  at the new Tulsa Arts and Humanities Council’s Hardesty Arts Center. Admission is free of charge. See www.concept-ok.org for more information. 

Probing Collective Memory: Gregory Ruppe

See Gregory Ruppe’s Residency artist video profile here.


Gregory Ruppe

Background: The Concept/OK: Art in Oklahoma exhibition welcomes the public until February 16, 2013 at the new Tulsa Arts and Humanities Council’s Hardesty Arts Center. Ruppe’s residency project remains on display throughout the exhibition. 
Residency Project Statement: 
Things will never be the same
Commonplace among households, the piano occupies a space of both reverence and burden. It is simultaneously cherished and unwanted. Its historical presence is bound to a collective memory that resists our willingness to discard it, though its typical inactivity reduces the object to an impractical piece of furniture inhabiting dead space. Using the piano as metaphor for greater social constructs, Things will never be the same takes an indeterminate position to question our nostalgia for the past, our relationship with the present, and the potential of activation when relinquishing control to the unknown.
Biography: 
Born in Houston, Texas, Gregory Ruppe received an MFA in Sculpture from Texas Christian University in 2012. He utilizes a broad range of mediums including castings, drawings, video, and sound to create installations and project-based works. He has exhibited regionally and internationally, most recently at Nasher Sculpture Center (Dallas) and Hiroshima Art Center (Japan). Ruppe is also a founding member of HOMECOMING!, an experimental art collective based in Fort Worth, where he currently lives and works. 
Read more in this previous postabout Ruppe’s residency. 

Life at the Border: Narciso Argüelles

See Narciso Argüelles Residency artist video profile here.


Narciso Argüelles
Residency Project Statement: 
Heaven Spots
“Heaven Spots” is an old urban art term that refers to high areas on buildings where street art is done; it also references the perils of working on such hard-to-reach sites. Public art has a long tradition in the Mexican culture that I—and the many Mexican-Americans in Oklahoma—belong to, from the Aztec murals, the frescoes of Diego Rivera, and the 1960s Chicano murals. My art reaffirms my culture and also protests injustices by reinterpreting familiar objects and icons in an unexpected manner. House Bill 1804 is an example of the anti-immigration climate in Oklahoma that I fight against. For me, this is part of my culture. This is not Street Art. 
Biography: 
Narciso Argüelles is an artist and educator living in Edmond. His art has been exhibited all over Oklahoma and around the world including a two person show at the [Artspace] at Untitled Gallery, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions Gallery, Intar Gallery, the Ninth Biennale of Sydney Australia, and the First Johannesburg Biennale in South Africa.  Argüelles’ fine art photography includes experimentation with printing surfaces, sometimes called Digital Alchemy. Some prints are done on aluminum and copper.  Argüelles’ goals include the promotion, preservation, and celebration of Mexican, Chicano, Latino and Indigenous art.  
Read more in this Art Focus Oklahoma magazine article or in previous posts hereand here. The Concept/OK: Art in Oklahoma exhibition welcomes the public until February 16, 2013 at the new Tulsa Arts and Humanities Council’s Hardesty Arts Center. See www.concept-ok.org for more information.