Video: Alexandra Knox, Momentum Spotlight Artist

8

Three artists received Momentum Spotlight commissions of $1,750 and three months of guidance from the curators. The Spotlight artists, Sarah Engel and Alexandra Knox of Norman, and JP Morrison of Bixby, are creating new artwork just for Momentum, which debuts March 4.

Read more about the Knox in this Art Focus Oklahoma magazine article or this past blog post. 
Momentum OKC opens March 4 & 5 with live music, performance and visual art by 97 young Oklahomans. The exhibition remains on display until March 8 at 311 S Klein, OKC. Learn more or buy tickets here.

Video: JP Morrison, Momentum Spotlight Artist

Three artists received Momentum Spotlight commissions of $1,750 and three months of guidance from the curators. The Spotlight artists, Sarah Engel and Alexandra Knox of Norman, and JP Morrison of Bixby, are creating new artwork just for Momentum.

Read more about the JP Morrison in this Art Focus Oklahoma magazine article or this past blog post. 
Momentum OKC opens March 4 & 5 with live music, performance and visual art by 97 young Oklahomans. The exhibition remains on display until March 8 at 311 S Klein, OKC. Learn more or buy tickets here.

Video: Sarah Engel, Momentum Spotlight Artist

Three artists received Momentum Spotlight commissions of $1,750 and three months of guidance from the curators. The Spotlight artists, Sarah Engel and Alexandra Knox of Norman, and JP Morrison of Bixby, are creating new artwork just for Momentum, which will debut March 4.

Read more about Sarah Engel in this Art Focus Oklahoma magazine article 
or this past blog post


Momentum OKC opens March 4 & 5 with live music, performance and visual art by 97 young Oklahomans. The exhibition remains on display until March 8 at 311 S Klein, OKC. Learn more or buy tickets here.

Grant Profile: Jan Holzbauer

Guest Author: Lauren Kubier, Intern
Jan Holzbauer, Jillian, Thread Painting, 10×8″ 2009
Jan Holzbauer will attend a four-day painting on fabric workshop in southern California with the help of an Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition Education Grant. She has experience painting images onto fabric and in quilting, but said she has yet to find a satisfactory method of painting images. She hopes the workshop will help her enhance the top of her quilts with stitches and thread panting.
Jan Holzbauer, Hope for the Future, Thread Painting, 16×20″ 2010
Based in Jennings, OK, Holzbauer graduated from Oklahoma State University with a BFA in 2010. She has exhibited in Sebastopol, CA and St. Joseph’s, MO as well as around Oklahoma. More information about Holzbauer can be found here: www.janholzbauer.com

The Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition provides project grants to artists to help themat watershed stages in starting and growing their careers. The next deadline is April 15 and guidelines can be found here. The program is supported by the Oklahoma Arts Council and Allied Arts as well as discerning individuals and businesses.   

Momentum Artist: Megan Bell

Megan Bell
Tulsa
Megan Bell, Rabbit, Clay, 12″x12″
Q: What was the concept behind your Momentum artworks?

Megan Bell: As far as concepts go I never tie myself down. When I pick up a piece of clay I have no idea what I’m going to end up with.

I do have a slew of little personalities that are played out in various sculptures which help get them into character.
 

Megan Bell, Cakes, Clay, 12″x12″
For example — It’s funny that these 2 sculptures were chosen to be in the same show, because in the beginning of their evolution they were meant to go together as one piece. But as I worked on them they began to take on 2 completely different personalities. As a result the “Rabbit” displays a deceptively innocent look while the “Chipmunk” has a sweet sexiness about her.

Q: Explain the technique and/or process you used to create your Momentum works.
Bell: My formal training is in design, not fine arts, so every sculpture is a learning experience. I try to get away with whatever the clay will let me get away with. I get very gutsy with my work, so as you can imagine I have had lots of failures. But in a way, that’s the fun of it. I try all kinds of new things to cast different moods and feelings onto the clay. My techniques change constantly. That is what makes every day exciting.


Momentum OKC opens March 4& 5 with live music, performance and visual art by 97 young Oklahomans.  The exhibition remains on display until March 8 at 311 S Klein, OKC. Learn more or buy tickets here.

We Need Public Art in Oklahoma!

3/17/11 Update:
House Bill 1665 was passed by the House and waiting to be heard in the Senate.
Senate Bill14 passed committee, but was not heard on the floor in time, so died.


We encourage you to still contact your Senator and the Governor to let them know the Oklahoma Art in Public Places Act should continue.  HB 1665 would suspend the program for 3 years. 


See a recent Tulsa World article about the program.  Watch for more updates on the Oklahoma Arts Council’s Arts Information Center: http://www.arts.ok.gov/news/arts_information_center.html

_________________________________________
Please speak up to your Representatives and Senators to let them know you want the Oklahoma Art in Public Places Act to continue.  Find your legislators contact information here: http://www.oklegislature.gov/ 


The Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition supports the Oklahoma Art in Public Places Act:
  • Passage of HB 1665, which will suspend the Oklahoma Art in Public Places Act for three years, will be detrimental for our state.   Passage of SB 14 is even worse, ending the program.
  • The percent for public art is paid for from capital project budget and does not affect the General Revenue Fund or other sources of state revenue.
  • Funds spent on public art improve our communities for minimal expense and create jobs for artists, who are small business people.
  • This program is only a few years old and just beginning to complete a variety of excellent art projects all over the state.
  •  Public art enlivens our cityscapes, reflects our distinctiveness, attracts tourism and creates economic benefit.  Public art can record our community history.  All distinctive communities include public art from the Statue of Liberty to the Vietnam Memorial. 
  • Cultural travelers, who make up 81% of tourists who travel over 50 miles from home, spend 40% more money and stay 50% longer, according to a recent Travel Industry Association of American study. Oklahoma will become a more exciting destination as artists create works that reflect the identity of our state.
  •  Last year for only $50,000, three Oklahoma artists were commissioned for public projects that transformed their careers and increased their business capacity.

8.     Read more facts about the Act here or see their website: http://www.okpublicart.org/index.html.  Please act quickly as these bills will be heard in the next day. 

Grant Profile: Merlin Little Thunder

Guest Author: Lauren Kubier, Intern 
Merlin Little Thunder, The New Sacred Bundle, Acrylic, 14×40″ 
Merlin Little Thunder will create artwork for publication, teach and demonstrate for the third annual Lek Treks and More in Woodward in part with help from an Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition Community Artist Partnership Grant.

Little Thunder’s goal is to preserve and record the history of the land, its animals and people of the past and present in a narrative painterly style.  For this project, Merlin’s artwork will combine images of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken with Native American images, showing the connection between nature and Native American traditions. Lek Treks and More raises awareness of the Lesser Prairie Chicken, a bird species endemic to a small area of the US that includes western Oklahoma, and one that is currently under threat from development and other factors.
Merlin Little Thunder, Cradled in the minnie
ha ha Gulch
, Acrylic, 14×40″
 
A Tulsa-based artist, Little Thunder is an enrolled member of the Southern Cheyenne tribe who has been painting professionally since 1980. His paintings are held in collections at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., the Fred Jones Museum in Norman, Oklahoma and the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City.  They have been displayed at the Governor’s Gallery at the State Capitol in Oklahoma City and at Wickenburg Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. He is a co-founder of Thunder Road Theatre in Tulsa and he works regularly with the Alternative Education Students in Canton, Oklahoma. Articles on his work have appeared in Southwest Art, Oklahoma Today, and on book covers for the University of Nebraska Press.

The Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition provides project grants to artists to help themat watershed stages in starting and growing their careers. The next deadline is April 15 and guidelines can be found here. The program is supported by the Oklahoma Arts Council and Allied Arts as well as discerning individuals and businesses.   

Momentum Artist: Keturah Fortner

Keturah Fortner
Norman

Keturah Fortner, Paper Trees, Paper, Steel, Plexiglass, 13″x2″x19″
Q: What was the concept behind your Momentum artworks?

Keturah Fortner: As I’ve gotten older I have become more aware of how fragile nature is and how we as humans affect the world around us. My art is meant to raise awareness of the impact humanity has on the earth and its potential consequences. These works reflect a period of my life when I wonder about having children, what kind of life they will have, and the disorder previous generations may surrender to their care. While making these pieces I also thought a lot about the measuring of Time, as reflected in the rings of a tree, a quilt passed down within a family, and waiting for the weather to change -hopefully for the better.
Keturah Fortner, North Pacific Garbage Patchwork Quilt, Found trash and fabrics, 52″x7’x2″

Q: Explain the technique and/or process you used to create your Momentum works.
KF: The problems facing us are numerous, then too are my interpretations and methods of work. I used subtractive, additive, and casting methods as well as incorporating found objects into this series. In each piece the materials used are just as important to the concept as its formal aspects.  If I want something to look cold or relate very much to humans I’ll use metal or plastics, conversely I will use organic materials like wood and clay to relate to nature.
I have a compulsion to find a harmony between the making of something and its concept, for example, using shinier synthetic fabrics as I moved toward the center of the North Pacific Garbage Patchwork Quilt (signifying a higher density of plastics in the water) and using duller cotton based fabrics toward the edges (cleaner, healthier waters).  
Keturah Fortner, Beerometer, Ceramic/cedar/bronze, 3’x5’x2′

I start with an issue that I think people should know about and I brainstorm on how best to talk about it visually through material, texture, color, shape, size, etc. With such serious and sometimes depressing topics I try to add a touch of irony or humor where I can, as evidenced in wood made of paper and punny titles like Bee-rometer. In all I get really excited about solving these puzzles in my art. I only hope we can find the joy in resolving some of the bigger concerns in life.

Momentum OKC opens March 4& 5 with live music, performance and visual art by 97 young Oklahomans.  The exhibition remains on display until March 8 at 311 S Klein, OKC. Learn more or buy tickets here.

Grant Profile: Stacey D. Miller

Guest Author: Lauren Kubier, Intern
Stacey D. Miller, The Angry Optimist, Monotype Print in Oil Ink, 10×10″ 
Shawnee-based artist Stacey Miller is creating large-scale monotype prints in part with support from an Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition Creative Project Grant. The prints will debut in May 2011 at the Oklahoma Capitol North Gallery and Miller is seeking other galleries starting in fall 2011 through 2013.
Describing her new work as “murals,” Miller envisions 25 -35 panel prints on 40 inch by 6-8 ft sheets of cotton rag.  She said the oil ink based print process can be challenging and physically demanding, so she has recruited artist assistants to help.  The grant will assist in purchase of Plexiglas, additional cotton rag sheets, ink and other basic supplies.
Stacey D. Miller, Cattails & Conception, Monotype Print in Oil Ink, 18×24″
Miller received a BA in Art at East Central University in Ada and participated in many printmaking workshops at the [Press] at Untitled, Los Milagros Print Studio, and Ayres Ranch. She helps coordinate the printing facility at [Press] at Untitled, organizing the 2009 Monothon and other printmaking events.
The Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition provides project grants to artists to help themat watershed stages in starting and growing their careers. The next deadline is April 15 and guidelines can be found here. The program is supported by the Oklahoma Arts Council and Allied Arts as well as discerning individuals and businesses.   

Momentum Spotlight: JP Morrison

JP Morrison, Attempts-At-Seeing-Into-The-Future,Graphite, colored pencil, and acrylic on board, 2010, 14” x 12” 

Featuring young artists ages 30 and younger working in all media in Oklahoma, Momentum OKC opens March 4 & 5.  Three artists were selected as Spotlight artists to develop in-depth projects, Sarah Engel, Alexandra Knox, and JP Morrison.  The artists, who were chosen from proposals, each receive an honorarium of $1,750 and several months of interaction with the curators. This year’s curators are Clint Stone and Erinn Gavaghan.


JP Morrison, Bixby

JP Morrison working in her studio

Project Concept: Mono-no-aware
“Mono-no-aware, is a Japanese term used to describe the bittersweet beauty of impermanence… it [will] be about my private experiences with the feelings of passion, hope and nostalgia, and that it [will] be the most personal narrative I have as yet explored. It is about joy and aching, flaws, lost lovers, past tender experiences, and my volatile journey to find harmony and fulfillment. While this work is significantly personal, the feelings that the installation grew from are universal; they are the effects (gestalt) of living surrounded by the tumult of our shared human experience and are equally poignant for us all,” said Morrison in her proposal.

Artist:
Morrison has exhibited frequently in Oklahoma and Kanas City.  She is a frequent demonstrator and teacher who received her BFA from the Kansas City Arts Institute in Painting and Creative Writing.  While in Kansas City, she curated exhibitions through Grothaus+Pearl Gallery.  She received a “Curators’ Choice Award” at the 2009 Momentum Tulsa and was a finalist for “e-merge” at Bullseye Glass in Portland, OR. Her work will be featured in a solo exhibition in JRB Art at the Elms in September.
JP Morrison working in her studio
Elements:
Morrison will drape a parachute to create a tent for visitors to enter.  Central in the tent, a reliquary will feature self-portrait paintings on boxes with fused glass inset.  Morrison also is creating light bulb “clouds” out of mixed materials. 

Challenges:
Installing her largest work yet, Morrison is confronting logistical challenges of how to how the parachute and creating the lighting environment on the interior.

Momentum OKC 2011 will open March 4 and 5 at the Farmer’s Public Market. Visit www.MomentumOklahoma.org for more information. Read more about the Spotlight artists in the forthcoming issue of Art Focus Oklahoma that will be posted online on March 1.